Creative Writing Workshops Spring-Summer Schedule


Writers Read at Fallbrook Library
Offers Two New Creative Writing Workshops

 

Writing for Our Lives – April-May 2017

Women’s voices are censored—often silenced—in a multitude of spirit-crushing ways. This creative writing workshop encourages women of all ages to explore our voices, our experiences, our spirits, and to write our stories, loud and clear.

Creative writing is a process of self-exploration and preservation. It’s healing and enlightening, and it’s also great fun, particularly when shared with other women.

This four-week workshop is for all women, seasoned writers and new, age 16 and older. Through a series of writing and sensory exercises, we’ll explore the ways of expressing the things we’ve always wanted to say. Whether our words are sorrowful or funny or frightening, erotic or peaceful or agitating, we are writing for our lives.

Fee: Free, thanks to the Whitten Welch Foundation, Friends of the Fallbrook Library and the Fallbrook Branch of the  San Diego County Library

Dates: Tuesdays, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m., April 4, 18, 25 and May 2.

Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S. Missioncreative writing workshops

To register: You must register in advance at the library’s front desk or call 760-731-4650. The workshop is limited to 10 people, so register early.

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Summer Read and Critique – June 2017

Join a group of committed writers who appreciate constructive input and writerly camaraderie.

Share pages weekly in a supportive workshop environment, receive guided feedback, and move your project forward.

Fee: Free

Dates: Saturdays, from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.,  June 3, 10, 17 and 24

Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S. Mission

To register: Registration for this workshop will begin in April.

•     •     •     •     •

For more information, contact Kit-Bacon Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com.

•     •     •     •     •

Workshop Facilitator

Kit-Bacon Gressitt has an MFA in Creative Writing, with an emphasis in narrative nonfiction, and has taught Women’s Studies in the Cal State University system. An award-winning feminist columnist for the North County Times, she also wrote book reviews and author features for the paper, until the Union-Trib gobbled it up. Now represented by Amanda Annis of Trident Media Group, Kit-Bacon’s political fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction have been published by The Missing Slate, Trivia: Feminist Voices, Ms. Magazine blog, San Diego Poetry Annual, New Moon Girl Media, San Diego Uptown News, San Diego Gay and Lesbian News, American University’s iVory Towerz, San Diego Free Press, and others, and she’s a founding editor of Writers Resist.

 

Creative Writing Workshops at Fallbrook Library


2017 Winter Workshop Schedule

 

Writing Craft

In this workshop, you will use your experiences—real and imagined—as a platform for learning the basics of the writing craft. Whether fiction or creative nonfiction, you’ll begin writing, playing with words, and responding to writing prompts, while exploring the basics of story structure, setting, action and character. Participants will also share their writing and learn from each other.

Fee: Free, thanks to Poets & Writers and Friends of the Fallbrook Library

Dates: Saturdays, January 7, 14, 28 and February 4, 2017, from 1 to 4 p.m.

Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S. Mission, 760-731-4650

To register: You must sign up at the library’s Front Desk in advance, and each workshop is limited to 12 people, so register early.

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Fallbrook writers group

Writing Narrative Nonfiction and Memoir

Do you have a true story that’s itching to be told? This workshop will help you learn to use the elements of good storytelling that make nonfiction as compelling as a great novel. With a series of writing exercises and collaborative feedback, we’ll explore the nonfiction side of creative writing.

Fee: Free, thanks to Poets & Writers and Friends of the Fallbrook Library

Dates: Tuesdays, January 31, February 7, 21 and 28, from 3 to 6 p.m.

Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S. Mission, 760-731-4650

To register: You must sign up at the library’s Front Desk in advance, and each workshop is limited to 12 people, so register early.

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Writing for Our Lives – 2017 schedule pending

Women’s voices are censored—often silenced—in a multitude of spirit-crushing ways. This workshop encourages women to explore our voices, our experiences, our spirits, and to write our stories, loud and clear.

Creative writing is a process of self-exploration and preservation. It’s healing and enlightening, and it’s also great fun, particularly when shared with other women.

This five-week workshop is for all women, seasoned writers and new. Through a series of writing and sensory exercises, we’ll explore the ways of expressing the things we’ve always wanted to say. Whether our words are sorrowful or funny or frightening, erotic or peaceful or agitating, we are writing for our lives.

Fee: $100

Dates: TBD

If you are interested in registering, please contact: K-B at 760-522-1064 or kbgressitt@gmail.com.

•     •     •     •     •

Workshop Facilitator

Kit-Bacon Gressitt has an MFA in Creative Writing, with an emphasis on narrative nonfiction, and has taught Women’s Studies in the Cal State University system. An award-winning feminist columnist for the North County Times, she also wrote book reviews and author features for the paper, until the Union-Trib gobbled it up. Now represented by Amanda Annis of Trident Media Group, Kit-Bacon’s political fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction have been published by The Missing SlateTrivia: Feminist Voices, Ms. Magazine blog, San Diego Poetry AnnualNew Moon Girl Media, San Diego Gay and Lesbian News, American University’s iVory TowerzSan Diego Free Press, and others, including her website, www.ExcuseMeImWriting.com, and she’s a founding editor of Writers Resist. K-B has taught writing workshops for seven years, most recently for the San Diego County Library system, and she teaches writing as a volunteer at Vallecitos School, in Rainbow. She has received awards for her writing from Chiron Review, Greater Los Angeles Press Club and the California Newspaper Publishers Association, and her feminist commentary was submitted for a Pulitzer Prize.

Writers Read: Summer writers groups and workshops


Writers Read offers creative writing workshops and writers groups in Fallbrook for beginning and seasoned writers, because writing is not for sissies—it’s for everyone!

 

Summer 2016 Workshop Schedule

 

Fallbrook writers groups

Writing for Our Lives

Women’s voices are censored—often silenced—in a multitude of spirit-crushing ways. This workshop encourages women to explore our voices, our experiences, our spirits, and to write our stories, loud and clear.

Creative writing is a process of self-exploration and preservation. It’s healing and enlightening, and it’s also great fun, particularly when shared with other women.

This five-week workshop is for all women, seasoned writers and new. Through a series of writing and sensory exercises, we’ll explore the ways of expressing the things we’ve always wanted to say. Whether our words are sorrowful or funny or frightening, erotic or peaceful or agitating, we are writing for our lives.

Fee: $100

Dates: Begins the week of July 4; will meet either Saturday or Sunday, depending on the group’s wishes. Please note that there will be field trips!

If you are interested in joining the group, please contact: K-B at 760-522-1064 or kbgressitt@gmail.com.

Read and Critique Writers Group – ongoing

This weekly writers group is for those who are actively working on narrative nonfiction.

Through lessons on writing craft and supportive feedback from a small group, we encourage writers’ pursuit of their projects and development of their skills.

Each week, writers share pages of a work in progress and the group offers facilitated and constructive craft-based critique.

Fee: $10 per week

If you are interested in joining the group, please contact: K-B at 760-522-1064 or kbgressitt@gmail.com.

 

Workshop Facilitator

Kit-Bacon Gressitt, represented by Trident Media Group, has an MFA in Creative Writing, with an emphasis on narrative nonfiction, and has taught Women’s Studies in the CalState University system. An award-winning feminist columnist for the North County Times, she also wrote book reviews and author features for the paper, until the Union-Trib gobbled it up. Kit-Bacon’s political fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction have been published by The Missing SlateTrivia: Feminist Voices, Ms. Magazine blog, San Diego Poetry AnnualNew Moon Girl Media, San Diego Gay and Lesbian News, American University’s iVory TowerzSan Diego Free Press, and others, including her website, www.ExcuseMeImWriting.com. K-B has taught writing workshops for seven years, most recently for the San Diego County Library system, and she teaches writing as a volunteer at Vallecitos School, in Rainbow. She has received awards for her writing from Chiron Review, Greater Los Angeles Press Club and the California Newspaper Publishers Association, and her feminist commentary was submitted for a Pulitzer Prize.

Writers Read Six-word Story Contest 2016


UPDATE: And our 2016 winners are…

Crime thriller by Gregg Brandalise
Broken teeth filled six Mason jars.

Disaster story by Patty Campbell
Let’s go home. If it’s there.

Melodrama by Christine Brandalise
My mother had called that day.

Political fiction by Marit Anderson
Abortion needed. Hanger used. Funeral tomorrow.

Romance by Francine Schwartz
Before I left, you said goodbye.

Satire by Lawrence J Klumas
Misplaced cell phone. My god—panic!

 

By popular demand, Writers Read at Fallbrook Library is conducting another six-word story contest.

babyshoesIn the vein of the story mythically attributed to Ernest Hemingway—”For sale: baby shoes. Never worn.”—we encourage you to be succinct and entertaining, while capturing the essence of a story in six words that imply a beginning, a middle, and an end. Tragedy, comedy, artfully mundane; any theme, any genre; whatever your inspiration produces, it must be exactly six words. Contractions count as one.

Enter as many six-word stories as you like, although submit only one story per entry form. Do not include titles.

Entries will be judged by yours truly, Kit-Bacon Gressitt, so you have only me to blame for the outcome.

Prizes will be awarded in an unknown number of categories (it depends on submissions). The prizes comprise a selection from among the books featured at Writers Read, since 2008, and an enthusiastic audience.

You do not need to be present to win, although winners are invited to read their stories at the open mic segment of the May 2016 reading.

The deadline for entries is April 20, 2016, at 12 midnight, Pacific.

Entry form: Now disabled.

 

Photo credit: Los Angeles County Museum of Art via a Creative Commons license

 

Jane Austen’s Desk


By Penny Perry

 

by Cassandra Austen, pencil and watercolour, circa 1810

by Cassandra Austen, pencil and watercolour, circa 1810

As if she had just left the room
the moment before, her desk
and chair wait in a corner
of the common sitting room.
The tour guide says,
“Miss Austen refused
to have the door’s squeak
oiled to silence. The noise
warned her of visitors.
She slid her work under a blotter.”
It would be hard to hide stamps
in this narrow desk,
never mind chunks, reams
of Persuasion and Emma,
but I like this story anyway.
She was not the great Jane Austen
then, but a dependent Aunt Jane,
welcoming a brother’s warm fire,
a neighbor’s joint of meat.
I can see Miss Jane Austen,
pen in hand, sitting at her desk,
dissecting her neighbor’s heart
as if it were her own.
The door squeaks. She swallows
a sigh of anger? Regret?
Still in that half-dream,
and standing now, her finger
taps mahogany. She changes
a word of dialogue, then steps
to greet her visitor. How many
sentences, scenes, books
did these visits cost?
Miss Austen wrote without benefit
of computer, independent income,
a room of her own.
Still, she had all a writer needs:
a stolen quarter of an hour,
paper, pen, the heart of a thief,
the mind in flames.
…………………………………………………..

 

About Penny Perry

PennyPerryKateHardingMugPenny Perry is a six-time Pushcart Prize nominee in poetry and fiction. Her work has appeared in California Quarterly, Lilith, Redbook, Earth’s Daughter, the Paterson Literary Review and the San Diego Poetry Annual.

Her first collection of poems, Santa Monica Disposal & Salvage (Garden Oak Press, 2012) earned praise from Marge Piercy, Steve Kowit, Diane Wakoski and Maria Mazziotti Gillan.

She writes under two names, Penny Perry and Kate Harding.

Jane Austen portrait from the National Portrait Gallery, London.

Writers Read at Fallbrook Library Presents Author Charles Degelman


Discussing

A Bowl Full of Nails and Gates of Eden

Preceded by open mic for original poetry and prose

Date: Tuesday, August 11, from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook, 760-731-4650

CharlieDegelmanGatesEdenCharles Degelman is an author, editor and educator living in Los Angeles. His first novel, Gates of Eden, is a 1960s story of resistance, rebellion and love. The book garnered a silver medal from the 2012 Independent Publishers Book Awards. A Bowl Full of Nails, published earlier this year by Harvard Square Editions, is set in the counterculture of the 1970s. It was a finalist in the Bellwether Competition, sponsored by Barbara Kingsolver.

After graduating Harvard, Degelman left academia to become an antiwaBowlNailsr activist, political theater artist, musician, communard, carpenter, hard-rock miner, and itinerant gypsy trucker. When the dust settled, he returned to his first love, writing. In the 1990s he was swept up by the film world and the burgeoning digital industry where he wrote and produced documentary and educational films for TNT, Churchill Films, Pyramid Films, Philips Interactive Media and others. Titles include a feature-length biography of filmmaker John Huston for TNT and an award-winning biography of Mozart for Philips Interactive.

Charlie’s books will be available for sale and signing.

For more information about Writers Read, contact K-B Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

 

 

Lexicon of an MFA Grad


By Kit-Bacon Gressitt

 

About to age out of a low-residency MFA creative writing program—you know, one of those online deals where you and the professors spend all day in your bathrobes, tied to your computers, drinking dusty Jack Daniels—I’ve one last obligation: the dreaded graduate lecture.

Now, before Father dropped dead by the fishpond, his sesquipedalian tendency rubbed off on my siblings and me, and my professors have occasionally called me on my resultant use of big, arcane words. But hey, it’s a grad program. Look them up! Besides, my lecture is Gender Studies-based, and it’s a lot easier to use the words that best describe such things.

On the other hand, I’m a little worried my profs are right. So, I’ve compromised by creating a party favor for lecture-goers, a handy lexicon with nice illustrative examples. I had some fun with it, too, so I figured I’d share, although maybe that’s just my self-absorbed nature. Anyway, here it is. I hope it’s useful.

Hegemony: a society’s dominant culture and its ideology.

In the USA, that’s white, patriarchal, Christian, heterosexual ideology. For example, take a look at the demographics of the U.S. Congress: 81 percent male, 82 percent white, 92 percent Christian and 97 percent heterosexual, although members of Congress have tended to postpone coming out until after they leave office. Happily, this is changing.

Hegemonic lens: the point of view of the dominant ideology.

2014PulitzerPrizeCmteThis point of view can blind the viewer to hegemonic representations (see below). In the realm of literature, Donna Tartt provides a nice example. The significant majority of people of color in her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Goldfinch are undeveloped characters restricted to the serving class.

Author Joy Castro wrote in her review of the novel for Salon: “Almost all the characters of color are servants, and they play bit parts. … Her servant characters don’t quite say, ‘You is kind. You is smart. You is important,’ as in The Help, but they come close.”

The 2014 Pulitzer Prize Board apparently failed to make note of this—perhaps a function of its being 74 percent white folks. Perhaps Ms. Tartt was similarly blinded, being of white Mississippi stock.

Hegemonic representation: a portrayal of someone or something that reflects hegemonic ideology.

Of course, white folks don’t expect to be pulled over for driving while white, have their purses searched in department stores or be killed by a police officer for peddling cigarettes, but when it happens to someone of color, white folks tend to assume that person is indeed a criminal because people of color are so often represented as such in popular media, news and propaganda (think Willie Horton, a classic). Folks of color tend to know it’s institutionalized racism perpetuated by hegemonic representations.

Enculturate: to imbue an individual with the traditional content of a culture, its ideology, practices and values.

Although a decided embarrassment, I admit to having been effectively enculturated by U.S. hegemony: When I hear the term “member of Congress,” I tend to think of a male, despite being a feminist and having a degree in Women’s Studies. Of course, if the member of Congress says something asinine about women, which so many of them do, I feel fairly confident the speaker is a male—or former Rep. Michele Bachmann—and there are those annoying demographics (see ‘Hegemony,’ above).

Socially constructed gender roles: prescribed roles and their relevant, ideal behaviors, defined by society and based on the binary of male or female.

A local example, the transgender student at Fallbrook High School who committed suicide a couple months ago did so, in part, because she felt overwhelmed by society’s failure to embrace her non-binary gender identity.

JDSocial location: the socio-cultural group to which an individual belongs and that lends the individual identity.

Hmm, I’m a Southern California low-residency MFA grad, which means I’m likely to be privileged, white, straight, creative, substance-abusing, cerebral, depressive and self-absorbed.

Close, but no cigar.

Love,
K-B

…………………………

About Kit-Bacon Gressitt

Spawned by a Southern Baptist creationist and a liberal social worker, I inherited the requisite sense of humor to survive family dinner-table debates and the imagination to avoid them.

As the Sunday political columnist at the San Diego North County Times, I won awards, a Pulitzer Prize submission, a fan club, and death threats from angry readers—but the sales department loved me. More recently, I wrote book reviews for the paper, which is no longer: The U-T ate it.

In the last few years, the San Diego Poetry Annual has published some of my late-night poetry, and my creative nonfiction has been published by Trivia: Voices of Feminism and Ms. Magazine blog among others.

Today, the pocket gophers and hummingbirds keep me company while I write—yippee!

Writers Read at Fallbrook Library Presents


May 12, 2015

Emerging Author Beth Newcomer

Discussing

The Art of the Short Story


Preceded by open mic for original poetry and prose

BethHeadshot_2_031715Date: Tuesday, May 12, from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook, 760-731-4650

Beth Escott Newcomer is a Pushcart-prize nominee for her short story “Tightrope,” published in The Sand Hill Review in 2013. Her fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in many literary publications, including The Alembic, Stickman ReviewThe Tulane Review and Diverse Voices Quarterly, which published her story “All She Wanted,” a Best of the Net nominee in 2013.

Beth grew up on Normal Avenue in Normal, Illinois, but now lives in Fallbrook, California. To support her writing habit, she manages the Southern California-based graphic design firm she founded and helps promote her family’s cacti and succulent nursery. Two little white dogs follow her everywhere she goes.

Beth’s short story monographs will be available for sale and signing, for $5 each.

For more information, contact K-B Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

January 13, 2015, Writers Read Presents


Jim Ruland

Writer. Sailor. Punk. Rat.

Discussing

Forest of Fortune and more…

Preceded by open mic for original poetry and prose

Jim-Books

Date: Tuesday, January 13, from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook, 760-731-4650

Jim Ruland is the author of the novel, Forest of Fortune, the short story collection Big Lonesome and co-author of Giving the Finger with Scott Campbell Jr. of Discovery Channel’s Deadliest Catch.

He is currently collaborating with Keith Morris, founding member of Black Flag, Circle Jerks and OFF!, on his memoir My Damage: 40 Years on the Front Lines of Punk.

A veteran of the U.S. Navy, Jim also runs the Southern California-based reading series Vermin on the Mount, now in its eleventh year.

For more information, contact K-B Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

Dorland Mountain Arts Colony


  Fall 2014
Dorland Logo102_0327 - Version ADorland Mountain Arts Colony is a beautiful retreat where artists, writers, musicians and composers can create in a secluded, natural setting overlooking the Temecula Valley Wine Country of Southern California.

 
Dorland…An Enchanted Place
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Deer at Dorland“Dorland is an enchanted place.” That was jotted down in my journal twenty years ago when I first came here. In time, we learned that long ago the Pechanga Indians made a seasonal camp here to gather acorns for their winter food supply. An elder from the neighboring reservation, who still visits, tells of other rites that took place here in our oak grove. Now a small herd of deer come in the spring with their fawns to feed on the acorns. Is it still an enchanted place?Most of our residents find that in their first few days here, curiously, they begin to shed much of the complexity, the jingle-jangle, the noise of what we accept as “normal life.” Their creativity finds a channel and begins to flow. They often accomplish much more than they had hoped to. We have word from them after they’ve left that whatever it was that happened to them here amid the oaks carries on. So yes, it is still an enchanted place.

Robert Willis 
Artist-in-Residence


Dorland  News


Your Truth in Fiction: Writing Workshop

102_0196 - Version 2On November 2, a group of writers met withLisa Fugard, author of Skinner’s Drift.  Attendees explored the process of taking their own life experiences and weaving them into fiction. Lisa said, “I was so happy to introduce new folks to the serenity and creative energy on the Mountain.” 

Lisa has been teaching at the Wellness and Writing Retreat in Nerano, Italy. She plans to return to Dorland early in the spring to continue the work on her next novel.Watch the Dorland website and Facebook for future workshops.


Associate Artists: Upcoming EventsThe January Associate Artist Gathering will feature readings, music and art presentations by members. In March, Dorland Associate Artists have been chosen to share their work at “Art Off the Walls on Mercedes.” The spring event, “Arts Under the Oaks” will be held in April. A “Picnic at Dorland” will be held in June to celebrate our members and all “Friends of Dorland.”
Dorland Associate Artists 2

Members, friends, and all those interested are invited to these gatherings. Watch the Dorland website and your email for more news and dates.


Volunteers

On behalf of Dorland, board
Michael at the lakemembers Michael Craig Carrier and Eileen Doktorski awarded plaques to Josh Wheeler, Justin Moreno, and Boy Scout Troop 301 to thank them for trail and pond restoration projects during 2013 and 2014 at Dorland. We are also grateful to the troop fortheir donation of a water-weed whacker.

M
ichael Car
rier, Dorland board member, and Gonzalo Aguado have been clearing thLake Ticanue reeds and brush around Lake Ticanu. He It is a joy to be able to see the water, complete with tiny fish, native frogs, and other pond life.The Reflecting Pond by the gazebo is being restored by  Pechanga Tribe members Vincent Ibanez and John Burbee. Thank you to these faithful friends and donors!


Residencies

Horton Cottage, Fall 2014
D
orland offers residencies from one week to twelve weeks to emerging and established artists, writers, musicians and composers. See our website for information.

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Alumni News

Jane Culp: Dorland Artist Captures Desert Landscapes
by Susan Montgomery (for full article, click here.)T

hroughout the years, many jane_'08 (1) - Version 2 4
accomplished artists have created some of their best work while they were Dorland Mountain Arts Colony residents. Dorland has provided the serenity and inspiration they needed to move forward with their work. Jane Culp is one of those artists.
        
Jane says, “Staying at Dorland over numerous residencies offered an emotionally supportive paradise where, immediately surrounded by the landscape and beauty, I could wake up to paint, contemplate, and understand more fully the Western landscape, as if we were one.”Dorland MountainJane is well known for her evocative Western landscapes in oil, charcoal and watercolor. She was a Dorland resident many times throughout the ’90s and has also been involved with Dorland in other significant ways. She has been a caretaker, served on the Dorland Board of Directors, and made a sizeable donation to help the Colony recover from its devastating 2004 fire.

Jane Culp’s paintings have received national recognition throughout her career through many exhibits and publications. Nineteen of her recent Anza Borrego paintings comprised a recent exhibit called “Suspect Terrain,” at the John Davis Gallery in Hudson, New York.

Dorland Mountain Arts Colony’s friends and supporters are very proud of Jane Culp’s association with the Colony over the years. Thank you, Jane, for your beautiful work and your support of Dorland.

If you are interested in viewing or purchasing Jane’s work go to her website: www.janeculpart.com or contact her directly at culp99@hotmail.com.


Tony Eprile has recently hadTony Eprile  residencies at the Studios of Key West and Yaddo. He received a 2014-15 grant from the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute and will be an invited resident artist at the Hermitage Artist Retreat. His writing has recently appeared in Poets & Writers Magazine, Inch, andPost Road, and he has work forthcoming in Agni.


Noelle SickelsNoëlle Sickels has just published her fourthOut of Lovenovel, Out of Love, about teen pregnancy in the 1960s. The book deals with search and reunion between birthparents and adoptees. Noëlle worked on previous novels during Dorland residencies in the 1990s.


BooksNaturallywebSue Ann Robinson‘s artist book was included in Binding Desire: SARstudioUnfolding Artists Books, a 2014 Exhibit at the Ben Maltz Gallery, Otis Art Institute, Los Angeles. In addition to working in her studio and as curator at the Long Beach Museum of Art, Robinson has begun teaching “Artists Books & Papermaking” at California State University Long Beach. Her artist book, The Walking Fools, was inspired by and begun during a residency here at Dorland.


lescarbeaumSince his residency a year ago at Dorland, Mitch LesCarbeau has had several poems accepted in literary magazines. “Nancy Underwood,” written at Dorland, was just accepted by The Bryant Literary Review.


on-foot-photo 2Thea Gavin‘s essay “Rim to Rim, Barefoot” has been included in a new (and first!) anthology of essays dedicated to the Grand Canyon hiking experience. On Foot: Grand Canyon Backpacking Stories was published by Vishnu Temple Press. (Vishnu Temple is an iconic rock formation in Grand Canyon.)


3 Guitars Black and WhiteIn July, Scott Ibex released his newest album,Horizon Tides. It is available on iTunes, Amazon MP3, and CD Baby. You can hear the first single Unconditional and a Behind the Music Interview with Scott on YouTube. He will soon be publishing his first novel, entitledHurricane Blues, which he wrote during his residency at Dorland.


Nathan Rivera began the song, How FaNathan Riverar Away while traveling through Spain and France and finished it on the piano at Dorland. Following his Dorland residency, he went on tour with his group, “The Orcastra,” through the western states. He is now traveling in Mexico and will stay again at Dorland in the late fall.


Alsop at DorlandMaureen Alsop was selected as the winner of the 2014 Tony Quagliano International Poetry Award. This biennial award is given to an accomplished poet with an outstanding, innovative body of work. Maureen Alsop’s latest poetry collection, Later, Knives & Trees was just publishLaterKnivesandTreesed in November 2014 and she will be doing readings in Hawaii, California, and Australia later this year. You can access an interview that was completed during her recent stay at Dorland here.
Residents Say …
Lesley Stern
Professor Emerita, University of California at San Diego, author of The Smoking Book and
Dead and Alive: The Body as Cinematic Thing
Lesley Stern

“Dorland is the perfect place for writing. Beautiful, serene, inspiring landscape. The cabins are extremely comfortable and the self catering suits me fine. It may seem to be more isolated than some other residencies, but shops are only 10 minutes away (though when you are there it seems a world away). Robert and Janice, who oversee the property are supportive without being intrusive. I have completed two major articles while staying at Dorland.”
____________________

Sherri C. Perry
Author of Venn, Mockingbird Lane Press 

“Dorland was exactly what ISherri C. Perry needed. Living in a big city and trying to write alongside a busy life requires serenity and time. At Dorland, I wrote, read, walked, and wrote some more. The wind, the hummingbirds and the sunsets were my companions. I can honestly say my summer residency in this wonderful place was the most productive two weeks I’ve ever had as a writer. I am excited to be returning in the spring.”
____________________

Diane Cluck

Musician

Diane Cluck by Herve Dulongcourty-1475x1475 2

My time at Dorland was so very special for me. Karen Parrott was the director and Robert Willis was the lovely caretaker. When I visited the colony it was still without electricity (which was a factor in my choosing to go there). Robert gave me the best recipe for the apple pie that he had made in his woodstove for a potluck we had that summer.

I‘m a singer-songwriter, and wrote my most successful album to date, Oh Vanillewhile staying at Dorland. You can see a little dedication I made on my website, here.
____________________

Barbara Perryman
Visual ArtistBarbaraPerrymanPainting“Inner peace, and creative spirit is what my Dorland residency brought to me. It is a very unique place, with so much to offer any serious artist. Dorland provides that special solitude we need in order to feed our creative minds.

BarbaraPerrymanI was recently asked to be president of the Canyon Lake Art Association. It is proving to be challenging, but rewarding. My goal is to bring a more expanded knowledge of art to its members, and to expand the community’s exposure to the visual arts.”
_____________________

Linda Saslow
Freelance Writer and Art TeacherLindaSaslowMy three trips to Dorland Arts Colony are remembered as a time of tranquil productivity in my life as a writer and painter. Getting away from the clutter and chaos of daily life is a gift that Dorland offers to the creative soul. My screenplay and memoir would have never been completed if not for my three sojourns on the
mountain. I can’t wait to come back to the calm and beauty of Dorland to reignite my spirit. The limited internet and lack of television offers a much needed break from the distractions of daily modern living. Being left alone to savor the natural beauty of California’s native landscape for long periods of time is truly magical for anyone lucky enough to become a resident at Dorland.”
____________________

Note to Re102_0297 2sidents…

If you have had a residency here, Dorland would be pleased to include your recent news and quotes in upcoming issues as space allows. It was good to hear from so many of you who were here before and after “the fire.” Dorland remains a truly enchanted place.
____________________

Artist walk
F
riends of Dorland

Thank you to these friends who contributed during 2014.Barbara Allen
Beverly Biber
John Burbee
Marcia Edwards
Frank Ellis
Penny  & Joe Fedorchak
Eleanor Goldstein
Curtis Horton
Misha Merrill
Christopher & Mary-Louise Muller
Donald Philip
James Reiss
Phillip Routh
Zane and Jane Trinkley
Jeff Thayer
Marion & Yet Siu
Robert Willis

If we’ve left anyone out, we sincerely apologize and appreciate your support. Many others have helped Dorland in ways that can’t be quantified. Dorland would not still exist today without the support of all.

Mailing address: P.O. Box 6, Temecula, CA 92593 ~ Physical Address: 36701 Highway 79 South, Temecula, CA 92592
 Tel: (951) 302-3837 ~ www.dorlandartscolony.org ~ info@dorlandartscolony.org
A California 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization

 

Writers Read at Fallbrook Library Presents


Deborah Smith Parker, author of The Horse that Haunts My Heart

and

Sarah Tauber, author of For Dear Life


Preceded by open mic for original poetry and prose
DateTuesday, November 18, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. (Please note this is the THIRD Tuesday of the month.)
Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook, 760-731-4650

HorseHaunts

ForDearLifeCoverDeborah Smith Parker, a professional astrologer, recalls the equine romance of her youth in The Horse that Haunts My Heart. This coming-of-age memoir takes place in the 1950s during three transformative summers Parker spent on a horse ranch in site of the Rocky Mountains.

Sarah Tauber’s For Dear Life is a survivor story. The memoir is about the two years Tauber lived in Tehran, Iran, the most challenging time of her life.

For Dear Life and The Horse that Haunts My Heart will be available for sale and signing.

For more information, contact K-B Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

• • • • • • • • •

There will be no reading December 9, 2014 in recognition of the extra work everyone has to do to survive the holidays.

See you again on Tuesday, January 13, 2015.

 

Spring After a Long Cold Berkeley Winter


By Penny PerrySatherGate

for Olivia

 

 

 

 

My old four cylinder Pontiac Tempest climbing
green, velour Berkeley hills. Your fiancé, my father
both in jails down south. Plum trees in bloom.
The latest New Directions in our scuffed purses.
Chanting “To a Poor Old Woman,” “Rip Rap,”
“Howl,” we cruise down dark, tree-lined streets past
Van Gogh irises, roses in bloom. One of the ivy-
covered bungalows could be Rexroth’s or Ginsberg’s.

Ginsberg, wild curls, wild arms, words like waves,
a nervous shepherd directing his flock on Telegraph.
You in a pea-green yellow check maternity dress.
The two of us standing in shadows at the curb.

My waitress, your secretary money running out.
Our apartment on Ashby. The oven door that never
closed. The window that never opened. Strawberries
from the co-op. Spiral notebooks with UC Berkeley

on the covers. We wrote all that spring. In love with
William Carlos Williams, his plums, his nasturtiums,
his asphodel, his white space. Our poems, footprints
on the page, we said. Seagull tracks across the sand.

Our hair neatly combed, shoes polished, we slid past
Sather Gate. We pretended we were UC students,
sneaked into the back of Thom Gunn’s poetry class.
The real students, girls from good homes, hawk nests
hair, torn blue jeans, were dropping out. We were
slipping in.

………………………….

About Penny Perry

A three time Pushcart nominee, twice for poetry and once for fiction, my stories and poems have been widely published in literary magazines. Fiction Daily tagged my short story “Haunting the Alley,” published online in Literary Mama.

My first collection of poetry, Santa Monica Disposal & Salvage, was published in 2012 by Garden Oak Press. The collection earned praise from Marge Piercy, Steve Kowit, Diane Wakoski and Maria Gillan.

I was the fiction editor for Knot Literary Magazine, a Middle Eastern literary journal. I was a screenwriting fellow at the American Film Institute, and my movie A Berkeley Christmas aired on PBS. I’m working on a novel about a school shooting.

I write under two names, Penny Perry and Kate Harding.

Photo Credit: Prayitno Photography via a Creative Commons license.

Women’s History Month: Women in Words


 

I Want a Sex Doll

By Sara Marchant

When my mother lived in Hemet, a neighbor in her senior apartments kept a sex doll. I use the word kept purposefully because a kept woman is what my mother thought the doll was when she first saw it and the neighbor treated his doll like a real woman.

My mother had called me, out of breath, to report that she saw a beautiful Eurasian woman staring plaintively out of her neighbor’s window, toward the apartment parking lot.

SexDoll“I think that old pervert has ordered one of those Russian girls off the internet,” my mother informed me, truly upset. “But what if he’s holding her hostage? She looked so sad.”

I promised to come over and check it out, more interested than alarmed; her elderly neighbor seemed too frail to be holding a robust Russian hostage. My mother was half right, there was a beautiful Eurasian girl in the apartment, but she wasn’t alive. The doll had been moved into the living room by the time we strolled over and peered through the window. And least you think us nosy busybodies—what if he had been holding a powerless foreign woman against her will?

“That isn’t the outfit she was wearing in the bedroom earlier,” my mother whispered and her tone implied that the bedroom outfit had been rather risqué.

The doll was sitting on the sofa, dressed in a low-cut blouse and a mini-skirt. My mother’s elderly neighbor was lying on the sofa, his head in the doll’s lap. He wasn’t watching television or reading; he appeared to be napping. I took my mother’s arm and walked her back to her apartment.

“I’ve read about those dolls.” My mother shook her head. “Can you imagine keeping one in the open like that?”

“I’d love to have one,” I admitted. My mother’s mouth dropped open.

“They have vaginas,” she whispered, her words an indictment.

“Well, yeah. They are meant for sex.” I shrugged. “But I don’t care about that. It would be fun to dress her up, style her hair and put her in the car and use the carpool lane. It would freak people out.”

Disturbed by my desire, my mother changed the subject.

In the coming months, before she moved out of the senior apartments (“Old people are annoying,” was her justification), and aside from the occasional judging remark about her “pervert” neighbor and reports of the doll’s new “trampy” outfits, my mother forgot about the doll. But I did not. That lonely old man with his head in his doll’s life-size lap was one of the most poignant scenes I have ever witnessed.

The scene reminded me of why I became a writer. As a child I played with dolls, re-enacting the dramas and joys of life, working through the stresses of childhood with my plastic avatars. When I became too old for Barbies (and if you think one is never too old for Barbies, I must say my husband does not agree) I started writing the stories I use to enact.

Now, in my small room of my own, I write the dramas and joys of the world I live in, without the benefit of my small plastic friends. With pen and laptop I create, explore and question. And if sometime I wish for a life-sized Barbie to sit next to me, listen with her plastic smile to that day’s words and offer silent encouragement, I don’t see anything wrong with that. Just please don’t tell my mother.

………………………

About Sara Marchant

Sara Marchant is a Master of Fine Arts Candidate in Creative Writing at the University of California Riverside, Palm Desert. She lives in the high desert of Anza, California, with her husband, their canine children, and sundry poultry.

Photo Credit: Soapstart D’lux via a Creative Common license.

Writers Read Presents Author Jincy Willett


February 11, 2014

Author Jincy Willett

discusses

Amy Falls Down

Amy Falls DownPreceded by open mic for original poetry and prose

Date: Tuesday, February 11, from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook, 760-731-4650

San Diego County-based author Jincy Willett has launched another novel loaded with social critique and her special blend of satiric humor and poignant clarity.

In Amy Falls Down, Willett revisits Amy Gallup, the heroine of The Writing Class, and 530210 ap.tifproceeds to skewer various public figures as Gallup rides the crest of an unexpected success. Amy Falls Down will be available at the reading for sale and signing.

Willett’s other works include the novel Winner of the National Book Award and her short story collection Jenny and the Jaws of Life, which humorist David Sedaris described as “the funniest collection of stories I’ve ever read—really funny and perfectly sad at the same time.”

Willett also teaches one-on-one fiction workshops online. Click here for more information. In fact, be sure to click on all the links in this post, at least the ones that mention Willett—her website is hilarious!

And one more thing: Check out this interview with Willett at Slate.com, with a nice dig at writers’ “platforms.”

For more information, contact K-B Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

 

Wishful Thinking


By K-B and some fabulous students 

Rainbow CA

……………………………………Rainbow, California……………………………………

Twice a week I teach writing to seventh and eighth graders at a small, rural school in Southern California. The school is the focal point of a fertile valley that keeps the Agua Tibia Mountains from toying with the Santa Margaritas. In this valley graced with ancient sycamores and gnarly live oaks, life and death, conflict and accord make their messy ways along tidy rows of ornamental plants, citrus trees, organic produce and the occasional hidden cannabis crop.

Nearly 60 percent of the area residents are white; nearly 70 percent of the students are Hispanic—many, the progeny of immigrants, the budding realizations of their parents’ faith in better things.

At the beginning of the school year, the children wrote of their hopes to become doctors and rappers and psychologists, artists and mechanical engineers and police officers, parents and soccer players and just content with their lives. At the end of the calendar year, they wrote descriptions of the gifts they would give to loved ones if there were no limits, ninguno.

Here are a some of their responses.

If I could, I would love to give my dad his mother back, and also the problems he has to all go away.

A gift that I wish I could present to my family would be for them to have a better life than they already have.

I wish I could give my brother a brand new car.

The gift I would love to give to children and adults is to find a cure for cancer. The gift would be an antidote strong enough to cure cancer in only a drink. It wouldn’t have an acrid taste or have any terrible side effects.

A gift I would wish to give is peace to the world … no fighting and everyone caring for each other.

A gift I would like to provide is money to the poor people in Africa.

I wish I could present [my friend] a unicorn. The unicorn’s name would be Bob, because Bob is an awesome name. … He would be able to talk and fart rainbows.

If I could grant a gift to someone I love, it would be to my parents and brother. It would be to present them papers.

I would like to present my grandpa a horse. … This gift would help my grandpa get stuff done quicker, since he’s so old.

A gift I would give to a homeless person would be a helpful dinner and clothes.

A gift that I would present to my father is an award for being an excellent example for me and my brother and for always telling us what’s worthy and what’s worthless.

I hope one day, when I have money, I’ll get my mom exactly what she wants.

If I could present any special gift to anyone I love, I would present the gift to my grandma … to convince her brother to spend with her the day of Christmas.

I would like to give to my grandpa on Christmas a phone so he can call me.

 

 

Writers Read Presents, January 14, 2014


Author Deanne Stillman

Discussing three of her books:

Mustang: the Saga of the Wild Horse in the American West,

Twentynine Palms: A True Story of Murder, Marines and the Mojave and

Desert Reckoning: A Town Sheriff, a Mojave Hermit, and the Biggest Manhunt in Modern California History

MustangCover
Preceded by open mic for original poetry and prose

Date: Tuesday, January 14, from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook, 760-731-4650

Deanne Stillman is a widely published, critically acclaimed writer. Her latest book, Desert Reckoning, based on a Rolling Stone article, won the Western Writers of America 2013 Spur Award and LA Press Club Award for best nonfiction. It was also a Southwest Book of the Year and was praised in the Los Angeles Times Book Review, Kirkus Reviews, Publisher’s Weekly, and the Denver Post.

Her previous book, Mustang: The Saga of the Wild Horse in the TwentyninePalmsCoverAmerican West, is a Los Angeles Times Book Review “best book 08,” winner of the 2008 California Book Awards silver medal for nonfiction, and recipient of numerous rave reviews, including, NPR, Atlantic, Orion, The Economist, The Santa Fe New Mexican, Publisher’s Weekly starred, and Kirkus Reviews. Mustang is currently under option for a film starring Wendie Malick, and it has been presented to President Obama as the book to read on wild horses and American history.

Stillman, who is on the faculty at the UCR-Palm Desert M.F.A. Low Residency Creative Writing Program, also wrote the cult classic Twentynine Palms, a Los Angeles Times Book Review “best book 01.” Hunter Thompson called it, “A strange and brilliant story by an important American writer.” Twentynine Palms: A True Story of Murder, Marines, and the Mojave, which is included in many college nonfiction classes around the country.

DesertReckoningCoverStillman’s books will be available at the reading for purchase and signing.

Read a Words with Writers interview with Deanne Stillman here, and view scenes from her books below.

For more information, contact K-B Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

Writers Read: The Itty Bitty Murder Mystery Contest and Winners of the “Tragus” Contest


 

And the winners of the Tragus Contest are …


Lori Bryant
: As she sat across the table on her first eHarmony date, Miranda fixated on the three wiry hairs protruding from that plump little hunk of flesh in front of the man’s ear canal, and she knew she could not stay another moment unless she asked him if he would object to her trimming his tragus.

Mary Barnes: When I told Gus to hand me his tray, he said, “Can’t—it’s fastened on.”

Beth Escott Newcomer: In that moment his ear became more irresistible to her than the story she was telling and her lips stopped whispering and her tongue started exploring, beginning with the low-hanging lobule, then up under the scaphoid fossa, around the stiff crus of helix, past the tragus and all the way down to his intertragic notch, which was where she paused to hear him let out a sweet sigh.

Thanks to our judges, Dan McClenaghan and Penny Perry, and to our winners and all who contributed!
……………………………………………………………………

Our next contest is … the Itty Bitty Murder Mystery


Submissions
: A barebones murder mystery that—in 100 words or less—explains the following:

Who did it?          To whom?          With what?          Where?          Why?

Prizes: Books, of course, for the top three entries

Your submission(s) may be any style, any tone—have at it!

Deadline: Wednesday 04 December 2013.

Winners will be announced, and books awarded, at next month’s reading, on 10 December, in the community room at Fallbrook Library, 6 p.m.

By entering this contest you give permission for your entry(ies) to be published online by www.ExcuseMeImWriting.com.

Email your entry(ies) in the body of a message to kbgressitt@gmail.com, and include the following information:

Your name
How your published name should appear
Email (will not be published)
Phone (will not be published)

Any questions? Email or call K-B at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

 

12 November 2013 Fallbrook Library’s Writers Read Presents


Diana Gould

Discussing her Hollywood Thriller, Coldwater


Coldwater Front Cover Feb 8 2013Preceded by open mic for original poetry and prose

Date: Tuesday, November 12, from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook, 760-731-4650

Diana Gould is an award-winning scriptwriter, producer and author of the new murder-mystery thriller Coldwater, lauded by television producer Steve Bochco as “not only a gripping murder mystery that exposes the lurid sex lives of Hollywood’s elite, but also a harrowing tale of addiction and redemption.” Gould has written pilots, movies, episodes and mini-series for network and cable. She was writer-producer of 05cc41cf73860a7e9d9ac0.L._V386892899_SX200_Dynasty, executive story consultant on Knot’s Landing, her script I Love You—Good-bye won the Population Institute Award, and she served on the Board of Directors of the Writers Guild of America. She received an MFA in fiction from Bennington, has taught fiction, screen and playwriting in the MFA program at Goddard, and coaches writers privately.

The author will be discussing Coldwater, which will be available for sale and signing.

Read more about Gould and Coldwater.

Our thanks to Mysterious Galaxy Books for their support.

For more information, contact Kit-Bacon Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.