Writers Read at Fallbrook Library Presents


Conney D. Williams and special guest Natalie Patterson

Celebrating National Poetry Month

 

Conney Williams National Poetry MonthDate: Tuesday, April 11, from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m.

Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook

Conney D. Williams, a poet, actor and performance artist, originally from Shreveport, Louisiana, is a favorite at Writers Read. He’s with us this month to share new works and celebrate the power of the written word.

Conney’s first collection of poetry, Leaves of Spilled Spirit from an Untamed Poet, was published in 2002. His poetry has also been published in various journals and anthologies including Voices from Leimert Park; America: At the End of the Day; and The Drumming Between Us. His collection Blues Red Soul Falsetto was published in December 2012, and he has released two new poetry CDs, Unsettled Water and River&Moan, available on his website.

Natalie Patterson National Poetry MonthNatalie Patterson is a Los Angeles-based poet, teaching artist and artrepreneur, dedicated to changing the world one poem at a time. Natalie starred in the web series “That’s What She Said” produced by SoulPancake and Darling Magazine. She collaborated with Sephora, resulting in the video “Wake Up Call” produced by Sephora University. She has traveled the country teaching and performing at universities, colleges and high schools. Poetry is the lens she sees life through, which supports her work as a teaching artist. Natalie leaves no topic untouched from inspiration to social justice and everything in between.

Conney and Natalie’s books and collections on CD will be available for sale and signing.

Join them—and bring your favorite poem, dark and dreary closet-writing, your randy limericks, whatever makes you happy—to celebrate with a room full of folks who know that poetry is not dead in the USA.

For more information, contact Kit-Bacon Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

Veterans’ Writing Group


November 15, 2016, Writers Read at Fallbrook Library Presents

 

Veterans’ Writing Group of San Diego County

reading from

Away for the Holidays

Screen Shot 2015-10-18 at 12.16.00 AMPreceded by open mic for original poetry and prose

Date: Tuesday, November 15, from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m.
Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook

Please note special date, due to the General Election on the 8th.

The Veterans’ Writing Group will be represented by six members, who will read from the group’s new collection, Away For The Holidays.

Garry Garretson, USN, Vietnam

Bud Parson, USN, corpsman Vietnam

Ron Pickett, USN aviator, Vietnam, 26 years of service

Dante Puccetti, Army Artillery Surveyor, Vietnam  

Terry Severhill, USMC, Vietnam

Stacey Thompson, USMC, 1999

The reading will be followed by a panel discussion with the authors, and Away for the Holidays will be available for sale and signing.

For more information, contact Kit-Bacon Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

 

The Story of Menil, Moon Maiden


By Ruth Nolan, featured author at Writers Read 11 October 2016

 

A Cahuilla Child, from the Edward S. Curtis Collection

You created me, brother, you got people right,
not the twin who made them face-backwards,
or into ludicrous stone-hens, you made me Moon,

delight of the people, beautiful sister smiling in her
room, a perfect, orbed syllable. And then, you
violated me, in ways unspeakable, you knew your

heart belonged to Coyote, and he roasted your
skin, the people gathered acorns in the long rows
of oak trees at the base of Tahquitz Peak, silent

in their respect for the thunder, and visioned past
Pedro Chino, great shaman on the deer hunt who
transformed himself into a mountain lion so he

could reach the highest peaks more quickly from
the desert floor, the women sang songs at the oasis,
and they planted trees from the canyon. I know,

I felt the mountain lion stalking me, that late day
I’d climbed San Jacinto Peak, and no one, even you
could see me there, dusk whispering to me, and I

was scared, three miles to go and the trail waning
dark. And so I went away, sad, at your command,
for you knew you could not keep me there. The

lions left prints in the snow as they tracked their
kill, just the way you bruised my skin and broke
my cheeks, and the people can only say that you

were not very nice to me, and so I went away. And
lucky for you, they remembered to pull your black
heart from the fire just before Coyote finished his

rabid feast, and you returned to them, you look
to the sky and see my wan smile, a waxing candle
light, and now my name is Eve, I’ve developed a

roundabout way of coming and going, filling the
orbit of your mind in slices and full pies, sister
you created and violated and sent away, I slant

through your opaque window, where you lie alone
at night, wanting me to fill in your hollow side,
your absent twin, I study you, I am shadow-fill.

……………………………

About Ruth Nolan

ruth_pictureRuth Nolan writes about the California desert. Her poetry collection Ruby Mountain was published by Finishing Line Press in 2016. Her short story, “Palimpsest,” published in LA Fiction: Southland Writing by Southland Writers (Red Hen Press, 2016), was selected as a finalist in the Sequestrum 2016 Editor’s Reprint contest, and her flash nonfiction essay collection, California Drive, won the Mojave River Press 2015 flash creative nonfiction contest. Ruth is also the editor of the critically-acclaimed anthology No Place for a Puritan: the Literature of California’s Deserts (Heyday Books, 2009).

Ruth’s fiction and nonfiction writing and poetry have also been published recently in Rattling Wall, Desert Oracle, Women’s Studies Quarterly, Rhino Baby, News from Native California, Sierra Club Desert Report, Lumen and The Desert Sun, Palm Springs. She also writes about California desert culture and the environment for KCET/Artbound Los Angeles and Inlandia Literary Journeys. She serves as an advisory committee member for Poets and Writers, California. Ruth holds her MFA in Creative Writing and Writing for the Performing Arts from the University of CA Riverside-Palm Desert and is professor of English, Creative Writing and American Indian Literature at College of the Desert in Palm Springs, CA. Visit her blog or email her at runolan@aol.com

Click here to learn more about the California Cahuilla creation stories.

Photo credit: A Cahuilla Child, from the U.S. LOC Edward S. Curtis Collection

Writers Read at Fallbrook Library Presents Ruth Nolan


Ruth Nolan, chronicler of the California desert, will read and discuss her writings, October 11, 2016

Ruby Mountain 
and No Place for a Puritan: the Literature of California’s Deserts

Preceded by open mic for original poetry and prose

DateTuesday, October 11, from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m.

Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook

 

desert writing poetryRuth Nolan writes about the California desert. Her poetry collection Ruby Mountain was published by Finishing Line Press in 2016. Her short story, “Palimpsest,” published in LA Fiction: Southland Writing by Southland Writers (Red Hen Press, 2016), was selected as a finalist in the Sequestrum 2016 Editor’s Reprint contest, and her flash nonfiction essay collection, California Drive, won the Mojave River Press 2015 flash creative nonfiction contest. Ruth is also the editor of the critically-acclaimed anthology No Place for a Puritan: the Literature of California’s Deserts (Heyday Books, 2009).

Ruth’s fiction and nonfiction writing and poetry have also been published recently in Rattling Wall, Desert Oracle, Women’s Studies Quarterly, Rhino Baby, News from Native California, Sierra desert writing proseClub Desert Report, Lumen and The Desert Sun, Palm Springs. She also writes about California desert culture and the environment for KCET/Artbound Los Angeles and Inlandia Literary Journeys. She serves as an advisory committee member for Poets and Writers, California. Ruth holds her MFA in Creative Writing and Writing for the Performing Arts from the University of CA Riverside-Palm Desert and is professor of English, Creative Writing and American Indian Literature at College of the Desert in Palm Springs, CA. Visit her blog or email her at runolan@aol.com.

Ruby Mountain and No Place for a Puritan: the Literature of California’s Deserts will be available for sale and signing.

For more information, contact Kit-Bacon Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

Writers Read at Fallbrook Library Presents Poet Karla Cordero


Spoken word artist reads from her new collection on Tuesday, Sep. 13


Karla Cordero

performing and discussing her new collection

Grasshoppers Before Gods

karla cordero poetPreceded by open mic for original poetry and prose

DateTuesday, September 13, from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m.

Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook

Karla Cordero is the 2015 recipient of the Spoken Word Immersion Fellowship for writers of color from The Loft Literary Center (Minnesota, Minneapolis) and recipient of the Global Diversity Award at San Diego State University. Cordero curates Voice For Change, a reading series inviting award winning spoken word artists to share their narratives on survival, and she hosts writing workshops for undocumented migrants in shelters located in Mexicali, Mexico.

She is a contributing writer for Poetry International and the founder and editor of Spit Journal, an online literary review for poetry and social justice. Cordero is the 2013 Grand Slam Champion and the first Latina female to be part of the San Diego Elevated slam team, which placed 4th in the nation at the National Poetry Slam in Boston. She received her Masters of Fine Arts in 2015 and currently teaches at San Diego City College.

Cordero’s work has been published in the Acentos Review, Word Riot, Toe Good Poetry and elsewhere. Her chapbook, Grasshoppers Before Gods (2016), was published by Dancing Girl Press, and it will be available at the reading for sale and signing.

For more information, contact Kit-Bacon Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

Readings from the San Diego Poetry Annual 2015-2016


San Diego Poetry AnnualPreceded by open mic for original poetry and prose

DateTuesday, August 9, from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m.

Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook

The San Diego Poetry Annual, published by Garden Oak Press, contains the work of poets from throughout the San Diego County region and beyond. The Annual includes two volumes: one bilingual Spanish-English volume, and one of poetry in English.

The new edition includes an eclectic group of poets, including our first Latino U.S. Poet Laureate, Juan Felipe Herrera, who was raised in Escondido.

 

Enjoy a sample poem from the collection:

Home Office

By Tom Somers

My raucous rooster’s crow in twilight gray
drives away the night’s refreshing sleep.
Waves rush in and wash my dreams away
tops foaming with commands I cannot keep:
Trade your soul, your peace, your all for cash!
By duty called I struggle to my feet and plod
ahead, in hope some day to fill my stash.
Dear God! Why does success elude this clod?

Still here and hopeless I’m not quite:
away I cast my phone to stop its ring
and forth into my garden take my flight,
where startled, fishy island heron now takes wing.
Work and worry vex me, yet it’s funny:
my soul is saved by sunshine and the bunny.

 

The San Diego Poetry Annual is part of the permanent collections of every college and university library in San Diego County, the county and city library systems, and the libraries of independent cities throughout the area.

Copies of both volumes of the 2015-2016 Annual will be available for sale at the reading.

For more information, contact Kit-Bacon Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

Writers Read: Parenting a Transgender Child


Hillary Whittington, author of Raising Ryland:
Our Story of Parenting a Transgender Child with No Strings Attached

Tuesday, June 14, from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

124 S. Mission, in the Fallbrook Library Community Room

parenting transgender childForty-one percent of transgender respondents to a survey, conducted by the Williams Institute at UCLA, reported having attempted suicide.

That’s almost ten times the rate of the overall U.S. population.

But statistics are just that, numbers, data without emotion or character—unless you have a personal connection.

Consider this: San Diego County lost four transgender or gender-nonconforming children to suicide in 2015, four we know of: Sage David, Taylor Alesana, Kyler Prescott and Emmett Castle. This makes the 41 percent disturbing, perhaps frightening—devastating for those who loved them.

For one local mother of a transgender child, such statistics have been motivating. That 41 percent, perhaps more than anything else, drove Hillary Whittington, a San Diego County resident, to write Raising Ryland: Our Story of Parenting a Transgender Child with No Strings Attached (William Morrow, February 23, 2016). Part memoir, part instructive lessons, Raising Ryland tells her family’s story of her son’s transition from female to male.

“Just even reading about [the suicides], it just kills me,” Whittington said in an interview. “I know we’re so lucky. A lot of people have attempted suicide. They’ve been through so much—even I can’t understand what it means to be transgender—but I can do my best to try to understand. I’ve read memoirs and talked to a lot of [transgender] people and I have friends, but I don’t know what it’s like for them.”

Yet Whittington does know much more than most parents. She has to—for Ryland’s sake. She’s become a passionate advocate for her son and an ally of the transgender community, yet her book speaks only for Ryland, her family, for herself. It recounts her doubts, familial conflicts, the turmoil of Ryland’s gradual revelation, and her fears for him. Born with the body of a girl and the heart and mind of a boy, Ryland eventually communicated this to his family explicitly. When they were able to accept it, they helped him to begin transitioning, with a boy’s haircut and all the accoutrements of a playful male child. They posted a YouTube video about their story, with the hope of enlightening others. And Ryland spoke at a San Diego LGBT event.

Now eight, he is well loved and admired. But it is what goes on outside accepting circles that puts transgender children most at risk, from unspoken rejection to outright bullying.

“People just don’t understand,” Whittington said. “There’s a lot of curiosity about it, a lot of fear—they fear what they don’t understand. I’m sure from the outside it seems like this crazy thing that we did [allowing Ryland to transition at his age]—‘Oh my gosh, what’s going on inside that home?’—just a huge curiosity by the average family that hasn’t been through it. But I think they do want to understand it. We’re all curious about things we don’t know. Hopefully, it’s for the right reasons. If we don’t expose the truth, people will never understand.”

Whittington strove to help people better understand, but she struggled with the exposure Ryland and the family had already received. While queries about reality television shows poured in, in response to their video, she wanted to protect Ryland from that level of scrutiny; to educate, not satisfy undue or hostile curiosity.

“As far as our family was concerned, I felt a book was the way that I wanted to explain things, the platform that I thought was more educational, the least invasive. Ryland just wants to be a kid. I want to protect him from what’s going on in the world.”

And Whittington knows in order to protect Ryland, change is essential.

“I want people to read my book who wouldn’t typically pick up a book about an LGBT topic. I’m actually hoping that Bill O’Reilly reads my book and that some of the people who typically wouldn’t care to understand this, get a little glimpse into my world, what it’s like in my shoes. I also want trans parents to read the book, because I don’t want them to feel that they’re alone. But I really hope for the bigger majority, because that’s what’s going to make change. There will be people who will criticize it, but hopefully I can change a couple minds with this book.”

Join us Tuesday, June 14, in the Fallbrook Library’s Community Room, for a lively discussion with the author. Raising Ryland will be available for sale and signing.

 

Need some help? 

The Trevor Project provides crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) young people, ages 13 to 24. Call the Trevor Lifeline at 866-488-7386.

 

Writers Read Presents T. Jefferson Parker


Reading from his new novel Crazy Blood

 

Date: Tuesday, April 12, from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m.
Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook

T. Jefferson Parker's Crazy Blood
Crazy Blood is Fallbrook author T. Jefferson Parker’s second literary departure from his long line of award-winning crime novels and short stories, including three Edgar Award winners.

Like his acclaimed novel, Full Measure, in which a Marine returns from Afghanistan to his parents’ ranch in the fire-ravaged town of Fallbrook, California, Crazy Blood is also a story of family and the search for identity.

But what a family it is, a dynasty of crazy ski racers, carving the slopes of Mammoth Lakes in California’s Sierra Nevada mountains.

Crazy Blood follows the third generation of a fatally conflicted clan of snow sports athletes and the brutal competition between two half-brothers, both Olympic hopefuls.

Parker has also written twenty crime novels, including the Charlie Hood Border Series. His books will be available for sale and signing.

Note: There will be no open mic at this reading.

For more information about Writers Read, contact K-B Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com.

 

Writers Read Presents Norman Fischer


 

NOTE SPECIAL READING DATE and LOCATION: 

Saturday, March 5, 2016, from 4 to 5:30

Café des Artistes


Norman Fischer, poet and essayist

reading from and discussing


Magnolias All At Once
poetry


Experience: Thinking, Writing, Language & Religion
, essays

 

Date:  Saturday, March 5, from 4 to 5:30 p.m.

Location:  Café des Artistes,103 S Main Ave, Fallbrookenter from the rear parking lot off Alvarado Street

Magnolias All At Once coverNorman Fischer is a prolific poet and essayist, and Zen Buddhist priest and teacher from the San Francisco Bay Area.  A graduate of the University of Iowa Writer’s Workshop, he was associated with the lively Bay Area avant-garde poetry scene in the late 1970s, and has continued to write and publish steadily since then.

Fischer ExperienceHis latest poetry collections are  Magnolias All At Once (Singing Horse Press, 2015), Escape This Crazy Life of Tears: Japan 2010 (Tinfish Press, 2014), The Strugglers (Singing Horse Press, 2013) and Conflict (Chax Press, 2012). His latest prose works are What Is Zen? Plain Talk for a Beginner’s Mind  (Shambhala Press, 2016), Experience: Thinking, Writing, Language and Religion (University of Alabama Press, 2015) and Training in Compassion: Zen Teachings on the Practice of Lojong (Shambhala, 2013).

Magnolias All At Once and Experience will be available for sale and signing.

CDAlogo
The Café des Artistes will offer a light supper menu during the reading, and wine, beer, coffees, teas and Italian sodas. The Café supports the literary arts, so please support the Café.

 

For more information about Writers Read,  contact K-B Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

 

Writers Read Presents, on February 9, 2016



WordOfPower

Poet and Novelist Jon Wesick 


Reading and discussing


Poetry: Words of Power, Dances of Freedom

Novels: Hunger for Annihilation and Yellow Lines    

 

 

Hunger

 

 

Preceded by open mic for original poetry and prose

Date: Tuesday, February 9, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook, 760-731-4650

 

 

YellowLinesHost of the Gelato Poetry Series in San Diego, author of the poetry collection Words of Power, Dances of Freedom and two novels, Hunger for Annihilation and Yellow Lines, Jon Wesick has published over three hundred poems in journals such as the Atlanta Review, Pearl and Slipstream. An editor of the San Diego Poetry Annual, he has also published nearly a hundred short stories, one of which was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. One of his poems won second place in the 2007 African American Writers and Artists contest. Another had a link on the Car Talk website. Jon has a Ph.D. in physics and is a longtime student of Buddhism and the martial arts.

 

For more information, contact Kit-Bacon Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

 

Come out of the closet and read!


 

Writers Read at Fallbrook Library

Free monthly readings of poetry and prose, with featured authors and open mic 

 

Presents

All Open Mic Night

Celebrate the New Year with writers of poetry and prose

those who read their work every chance they get

those who’ve never read publicly before

those who fall somewhere in between

 

Join these and other book lovers on Tuesday 12 January, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 

Books

Come out of the closet and read!

 

Fallbrook Library •124 S. Mission Road • Fallbrook

Next Writers Read: Tue. 09 Feb, featuring performance poet Karla Cordero

For more information, contact K-B Gressitt at 760-522-1064 or kbgressitt@gmail.com

or visit www.ExcuseMeImWriting.com

Writers Read Presents T. Jefferson Parker


December 8, 2015 at Fallbrook Library

 

T. Jefferson ParkerJeffParkerMug

 

with the paperback release of Full Measure

 

and an exclusive reading from his new thriller Crazy Blood

 

FullMeasurePreceded by open mic for original poetry and prose

Date: Tuesday, December 8, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook, 760-731-4650

T. Jefferson Parker, three-time Edgar Award winner, is the author of the celebrated novel, Full Measure, available in paperback December 1—in time for holiday gift-giving. Marine Patrick Norris returns from Afghanistan to find his hometown, Fallbrook, recovering from a wildfire; his parents facing a devastated CrazyBloodavocado ranch;  and his troubled brother, struggling with his own battles.

Jeff will give an exclusive reading of an excerpt from his new thriller, Crazy Blood, to be released in March 2016. A volatile family feud carves the slopes at the Mammoth Cup ski race, an Olympics qualifier.

Jeff has also written twenty crime novels, including the acclaimed Charlie Hood Border Series. His books will be available for sale and signing.

For more information about Writers Read, contact K-B Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

 

Writers Read Presents David Ulin, Author and Book Critic


 

October 13, 2015, at Fallbrook Library

Author David L. Ulin

Discusses

Sidewalking: Coming to Terms with Los Angeles

Preceded by open mic for original poetry and prose

 

SidewalkingDate: Tuesday, October 13, from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Location: Fallbrook Library, 124 S Mission, Fallbrook, 760-731-4650

David L. Ulin, author and book critic for the L.A. Times will read and discuss his new book, Sidewalking: Coming to Terms with Los Angeles. Ulin’s other books include the novella Labyrinth, The Lost Art of Reading: Why Books Matter in a Distracted Time and the Library of America’s Writing Los Angeles: A Literary Anthology, which won a California Book Award. Ulin is a core faculty member at the UC Riverside low residency MFA in Creative Writing Program and teaches at the University of Southern California. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship this summer.

Minolta DSCIn Sidewalking, published by University of California Press, Ulin explores the city’s built environment and the emotional landscape through which the city’s residents travel. Susan Orlean, author of The Orchid Thief, described Sidewalking as “a profound and poetic book. It is a meditation not only on the strange and marvelous nature of Los Angeles but also on the nature of history, memory, and community itself. This is nonfiction writing at its very best.”

For more information about Writers Read, contact K-B Gressitt at kbgressitt@gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

Photo credit: Noah Ulin.